KS2

He Is Risen

SAMPLE CONTENT

INTRO   |    LESSON 1   |   LESSON 2   |   ASSEMBLY

Lesson One

The Power of Poetry (Starter)

The Power of Poetry (Starter)

Show Slide 1 from the Powerpoint Poetic Power. Invite your pupils to tell you about the picture. As appropriate, draw out how a simple description that informs our minds may not convey the real depth of meaning and significance, but poetry can do that as it speaks to our emotions and causes us to think more deeply.  (If appropriate you could quote the aphorism that ‘Good art makes you feel so much, you can’t help but think’.)  As appropriate, show Slides 2 and 3 which provide a simple description and then a poetic reflection.

Repeat this with Slides 4-9 which provide a stimulus picture and a simple description, inviting your pupils to suggest a poetic reflection. Use Slide 10 to introduce this lesson material which will use poetry to explore the biblical story of the death and resurrection of Jesus (the Easter story), and culminate in writing a poem about the Easter story.

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Introducing Superbook

Introducing Superbook

If your pupils are unfamiliar with the Superbook TV series you may find it helpful to use this Character introduction video.

Superbook is a series of TV programmes in which two children (Chris and Joy) together with their robot friend (Gizmo) go on adventures back in time, where they meet characters from the Bible and explore their stories.

If appropriate you could draw the parallel with the Oxford Reading Tree adventures of Biff, Chip and Kipper, and their magic key.

Play the downloadable video Introducing Superbook

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Starting with the Story (Contextual Enquiry)

Starting with the Story (Contextual Enquiry)

Good poets often start with a story, and use their poem to draw out the meaning and significance by speaking to the emotions of the reader. Since we are going to write a poem about the death and resurrection of Jesus we must start by looking at that biblical story.

There are four Gospels in the Bible – Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. They each tell of the death and resurrection of Jesus. Here we will look particularly at Matthew’s account.

Give out the worksheet Matthews Account of the Easter Story which contains an edited version of the story (given in full in chapters 26-28 of Matthew’s gospel, in the CEB translation) and, as appropriate for your pupils, invite them to read it.

The death and resurrection of Jesus is a very dramatic event with huge significance to millions of Christians. From simply reading the account do they get a sense of what a dramatic and significant event it was? Probably not. It is only as we dig into what happened that we will understand the depth of the event.

So, to help, invite them to watch this video which presents the story visually. Play Overview of the Easter story.

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As appropriate, after showing the video, you could show it again, in sections, inviting your pupils to look at the worksheet as you do so.  stopping it at appropriate points. Were there particular parts of the story that they found especially powerful, around which they could write their poem?

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Structure and Figurative Language in Poetry (Whole Class Activity)

Structure and Figurative Language in Poetry (Whole Class Activity)

Having thought about the story, good poets then think about the structure they will use for their poem and the figurative language they will include in it.

The next parts of this lesson material will look at the structure and figurative language in Psalm 22, which is a poem in the Bible that seems to be about the death and resurrection of Jesus. This section is not essential and would probably only be suitable for KS2 pupils. If you want to set this material in context in the English curriculum, depending upon what your pupils have already learned, or need to learn, about structure and figurative language in poetry, you may find the following basic information useful:

  • Structure. There are many different structural forms for poetry, such as Haiku and Limerick.
    • A Haiku is a three-line poem with 17 syllables in a 5-7-5 structure. It usually does not rhyme, but is typically reflective about an experience of nature. Here’s an example:
    • Tiny buzzing bee
    • Darting between the flowers
    • In the bright sunshine
    • A Limerick is a five-line poem with an AABBA rhyming structure. It is typically humorous (and often nonsensical). Here’s an example:
    • There was a young lady from Leeds
    • Who swallowed a packet of seeds.
    • Now this sorry young lass
    • Is quite covered in grass,
    • But has all the tomatoes she needs.
  • Figurative language. Poets use many different forms of figurative language, such as hyperbole and personification.
    • Hyperbole is where exaggeration is used to create a strong effect, such as: ‘I could hear you a mile away’ or ‘these shoes are killing me’.
    • Personification is where an object or idea is given human characteristics or qualities, such as ‘the car crawled up the hill’ or ‘lightning danced across the sky’.
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Structure and Figurative Language in Psalm 22 (Contextual Enquiry)

Structure and Figurative Language in Psalm 22 (Contextual Enquiry)

Give out Page 1 of the worksheet Psalm 22 and explain that this poem from the Bible seems to be about the death and resurrection of Jesus. (If appropriate you could explain that the actual Psalm is much longer, and this worksheet just contains some sections of the Psalm, from the CEB translation, arranged to help them understand it). As appropriate, read through the Psalm inviting them to consider the structure and figurative language that it contains, which we will explore now:

  • Structure.
    • Much of the Bible is written in the form of poetry known as Parallelism. This is a very simple structure in which clauses or sentences come in pairs. Unlike a Haiku with its complex syllable structure, or a Limerick with its complex rhyming structure, Parallelism can have paired clauses or sentences of any length (within reason), and without the need for rhyming.
    • Invite them to look at the worksheet and see how Psalm 22 uses this simple structure.
    • For differentiated learning within KS2 you could explain the three types of parallelism and invite them to identify which of these is used in Psalm 22:
      • Synonymous Parallelism is where the second clause or sentence basically repeats the concept of the first one, but using different words. An example is in Psalm 25 “Make your ways known to me, Lord; teach me your paths.”
      • Antithetical Parallelism is where the second clause or sentence expresses the opposite side of the same concept. An example is in Psalm 20 “They will collapse and fall; but we will stand up straight and strong.”
      • Synthetic Parallelism is where the second clause or sentence is a new, but related, concept, building upon the first. This is the form of parallelism used in these extracts of Psalm 22.
  • Figurative language.
    • Give out the picture/text boxes cut out from page 2 of the worksheet, mixed together. As appropriate, to make it simpler (particularly if you are using any of this with KS1 pupils), you could just give out the first two picture/text boxes at this stage.
    • Invite your pupils to see if they can match up these parts of the Easter story with the verses of Psalm 22. As appropriate show the video Figurative language in Psalm 22 which explains the first two sets of verses which relate to the first two picture/text boxes (which will be even easier if you have only given out the first two picture/text boxes at this stage).

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As appropriate, having matched up the story with verses of Psalm 22, invite them to consider whether  particular parts of the story inspire them to write their own poem, or perhaps they would like to write a poem about other parts of the story?

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